Trying to catch a salmon

Atlantic salmon is one of the most sought-after fish in Norway, both for their strength and the excellent taste. Many fishermen spend their summers next to a Norwegian salmon river hoping they will be the lucky ones to hook up to a feisty piece of chrome goodness. I had heard many tales of frustration and fishermen spending several weeks, months and even years without catching a single salmon. Still they kept on slinging their flies year after year almost like a ritual pilgrimage. For my part I had stayed clear of this fishing, focusing on the brown trout and even tropical fishing instead. But this year I had more free time and decided I would give it a go. I first met up with my friend Richard who lives close by to the river Stjørdalselva. He lent me a good old 2-handed fly rod and gave me some basic casting instructions. I spent some days there honing my casting skills and hoped that a salmon would take my fly in the process. But it was not to be… There did not seem to be that many salmon in the river and over the course of 5 fishing days only a few revealed themselves out in the current. I then met up with another friend Kurt and together we fished the river Forra close by. But then came a massive downpour of rain and the rivers became flooded and unfishable. I decided that salmon fishing sucked and headed up into the mountains to catch some trout instead.

But the dream of catching my first salmon haunted me and after some days I decided to give it another go. To increase my chances, I headed further north to check out some of the smaller rivers north of Trondheim. There are several of them in the area and reports talked about good number of smaller salmon in the rivers. I decided on the river Øyensåa and made my way there to buy the fishing license. The riverkeepers informed me that I was the only one in the lower stretches of the river that day and that a lot of salmon had gone through the counter. I made my way down to the river fielding a one hander #6 setup with floating line. It did not take long before I saw the first salmon jump and then many more soon after. I had a tingling sensation that my first salmon on the fly was close. The current was a bit difficult and it took me a while to find stretches that gave the fly a nice drag. But after a while I got it right and started to hook up to several small salmon in the 1-2 kg range. No biggies but very good fun on the 6-weight! I will definitively give the salmon more attention going forward, but trout will still be my 1st priority for now. Now I will continue my fly fishing adventure up north and hope that summer will follow me on my way.

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Stjørdalselva
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My friend Richard Bakken showing me how to cast properly.
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Thanks for lending me a 2-handed setup Richard.
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Me & Kurt taking cover from the rain in the river Forra.
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The river Øyensåa
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The vegitation along the bank was very lush and reminded me of some places in New Zealand.

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One Comment Add yours

  1. Gunnar Augland says:

    Laksefisker’n jo!!:) Det så så fint ut på det strekket at jeg fikk helt kløa,men som du skriver så fint,håper sommeren følger deg opp nordover!:-) Cool André!

    man. 26. jun. 2017 kl. 11.18 skrev Flyslingers :

    > flyslingers posted: “Atlantic salmon is one of the most sought-after fish > in Norway, both for their strength and the excellent taste. Many fishermen > spend their summers next to a Norwegian salmon river hoping they will be > the lucky ones to hook up to a feisty piece of chrome ” >

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